Biosafety Manual

23 Biosafety Manual classroom training courses. Visit Learn @ISU f or more information or to register for classes. Signs and Labeling Anyone entering areas where biohazardous materials are used must be aware of the potential hazards. Specific door signs for this purpose are provided by EH&S; call (515) 294-5359. Red door signs indicating “human biohazards” must be posted at the entrance of rooms where microorganisms or biological toxins known to cause disease in humans are used. This includes microorganisms classified as Biosafety Level 2 (BSL- 2) or greater and human blood, tissues, cell lines, or OPIM. Red or orange biohazard labels must be placed on containers and storage units (refrigerators, freezers, incubators, waste containers, etc.) used for microorganisms or biological toxins causing disease in humans, or human blood, tissues, cell lines, or OPIM. Contaminated equipment and biohazardous waste must be labeled in the same manner. Yellow door signs indicating “animal biohazards” must be posted at the entrance of rooms where strict animal pathogens are used. Dark green door signs indicating “plant biohazards” must be posted at the entrance of rooms where strict plant pathogens or pests are used, or where certain Genetically Modified (GM) plants are grown or processed. Where multiple biohazards are present, human hazards generally take precedence over animal and plant hazards when choosing which sign to use. For EH&S assistance and to obtain correct signs, call (515) 294-5359. The emergency contact information, contains the minimum requirements for working in each space, shall be displayed at the laboratory entrance. The door signage must be tailored to the specific hazards in the laboratory environment. The door signage program requires a current chemical inventory. If you have questions about required signage, please contact EH&S at (515) 294-5359. Security Some level of security is warranted for all laboratories, based on the existing risks and regulatory requirements. Each laboratory should conduct a risk assessment to determine appropriate security measures. Some examples of security measures include locked buildings, locked laboratories, locked storage units, limiting distribution of brass keys, proximity cards or key codes, and personnel background checks. For detailed information on biohazardous materials security requirements, refer to the Biosecurity section of this manual.

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